How to restate a thesis statement

How to restate a thesis statement
How to restate a thesis statement

A thesis statement is a sentence that summarizes the main argument or claim of your essay. It usually appears at the end of the introduction and guides the reader through your body paragraphs. A restated thesis statement is a rephrased and restructured version of the original thesis statement. It usually appears at the end of the conclusion and reminds the reader of what you have proven in your essay. A restated thesis statement should not repeat the original thesis statement word for word, but rather use different words and sentence structures to convey the same meaning.

The purpose of restating a thesis statement is to reinforce your central argument, show the reader that you have considered different perspectives, and signal the end of your essay. To restate a thesis statement effectively, you need to follow these steps:

  • Reread the original thesis statement carefully and identify the main keywords and points that you need to include in the restated thesis statement.
  • Use synonyms, antonyms, or related words to replace the keywords and avoid repetition. For example, if the original thesis statement is “Social media hurts teenagers’ mental health”, you can use words like “harmful”, “adverse”, “detrimental”, or “damaging” instead of “negative”.
  • Change the sentence structure and word order to make the restated thesis statement different from the original one. For example, you can use a passive voice, a question, a conditional clause, or a parallel structure to rephrase the original thesis statement. For example, if the original thesis statement is “Social media hurts teenagers’ mental health”, you can restate it as “Teenagers’ mental health is negatively affected by social media”, “How does social media negatively impact teenagers’ mental health?”, “If social media negatively impacts teenagers’ mental health, what can be done to prevent it?”, or “Social media negatively impacts teenagers’ mental health by exposing them to cyberbullying, unrealistic expectations, and isolation”.
  • Add some original contribution or insight to the restated thesis statement without changing its meaning. For example, you can mention the implications, recommendations, or limitations of your argument, or connect it to a broader context or issue. For example, if the original thesis statement is “Social media hurts teenagers’ mental health”, you can restate it as “Social media hurts teenagers’ mental health, which calls for more awareness and regulation from parents, educators, and policymakers”, “Social media hurts teenagers’ mental health, but it can also be a source of support and empowerment if used wisely and responsibly”, or “Social media hurts teenagers’ mental health, but this effect may vary depending on the individual, the platform, and the content”.

Here are some examples of original and restated thesis statements based on the web search results from my internal tool: