Why the peoples of Europe were so eager to believe that peace 

Why the peoples of Europe were so eager to believe that peace was possible through such acts as the Kellogg-Briand pact and the agreements at Locarno? What was wrong with such ideas? *underline thesis statement.

Why the peoples of Europe were so eager to believe that peace

Why the peoples of Europe were so eager to believe that peace was possible through such acts as the Kellogg-Briand pact and the agreements at Locarno? What was wrong with such ideas? *underline thesis statement.

Refer to:
World Civilization Essentials Kindle Edition (Chapter 18) by T.H. Baughman (Author), Jennifer L. Corley (Author) Format: Kindle Edition

*Can be found on amazon

More details;

Pact of Locarno

Pact of Locarno, (Dec. 1, 1925), series of agreements whereby GermanyFranceBelgium, Great Britain, and Italy mutually guaranteed peace in western Europe. The treaties were initialed at Locarno, Switz., on October 16 and signed in London on December 1.

The agreements consisted of

Firstly, a treaty of mutual guarantee between Germany, Belgium, France, Great Britain, and Italy;

Secondly, arbitration treaties between Germany and Belgium and between Germany and France;

Thirdly, a note from the former Allies to Germany explaining the use of sanctions against a covenant-breaking state as outlined in article 16 of the League of Nations Covenant;

Fourthly, arbitration treaties between Germany and Czechoslovakia and between Germany and Poland; and

Finally, treaties of guarantee between France and Poland and between France and Czechoslovakia.

The treaty of mutual guarantee provided that the German-Belgian and Franco-German frontiers as fixed by the Treaty of Versailles were inviolable; that Germany, Belgium, and France would never attack each other except in “legitimate defense” or in consequence of a League of Nations obligation; that they would settle their disputes by pacific means; and that in case of an alleged breach of these undertakings, the signatories would come to the defense of the party adjudged by the League to be the party attacked and also in case of a “flagrant violation.” The treaties of guarantee between France and Poland or Czechoslovakia provided for mutual support against unprovoked attack. A further consequence of the pact was the evacuation of Allied troops from the Rhineland in 1930, five years ahead of schedule.

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